Thank you Richard Hesse

richard-hesseWe would like to send out a big THANK YOU to Richard Hesse for his thought provoking presentation about the US Supreme Court presented on October 18th in the Cilley Meeting Room. A small but highly engaged audience of 15 people, young and old, were impressed by Mr. Hesse’s knowledge and were astounded to find out many little known facts. For instance, Congress (in particular the Senate) has profound power over The Supreme Court. In the current brouhaha over confirmation of President Obama’s nominee, the Senate could just as easily vote to permanently downsize the Supreme Court to 8 or 7 or any other number of members. They have that much power! Thank you to the NH Humanities Council for their generous support for this kind of community programming at the Hill Library.

NH Humanity Council Logo

If you would like to find out more about how the US Government works, this is an excellent website.  It is designed for kids but also has tabs for teens, teachers and parents.  Enjoy exploring.

6:30 The US Supreme Court

Welcome Professor Richard Hesse on Tuesday, October 18, at 6:30 p.m. for a program titled: The U.S. Supreme Court: How Does It Operate!
In the 20th century the U.S. Supreme Court came to be a powerful force in modern society. Richard Hesse, Professor Emeritus, UNH School of Law, will discuss how its members are chosen and how it operates. He will explore familiar examples of historical and contemporary debates over social policy and take a more careful look at this peculiarly “anti-democratic” institution. And, given the current controversy surrounding President Obama’s nomination of Merrick Garland to the Court and Congress’s refusal to provide “advice and consent”, there is sure to be lively discussion on this important matter. Please join us for this conversation with Richard Hesse.

The US Supreme Court – How Does it Operate

Photo of US Supreme Court Justices

Tuesday October 18th, 2016 – 6:30 PM

Richard Hesse, Professor Emeritus, UNH School of Law, will discuss how Supreme Court Justices are chosen and how the Court operates. He will explore familiar examples of historical and contemporary debates over social policy and take a more careful look at this peculiarly “anti-democratic” institution. And, given the current controversy surrounding President Obama’s nomination of Merrick Garland to the Court and Congress’s refusal to provide “advice and consent”, there is sure to be lively discussion on this important matter.